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Alderson Broaddus announces new Cyber Security program to begin in the fall

PHILIPPI — Alderson Broaddus University announced cybersecurity as its newest undergraduate major Thursday. The program will prepare students for the multidisciplinary aspects of securing software, networks, web and mobile systems. Dr. Ross Brittain, dean of the College of Science, Technology & Mathematics, said when President Tim Barry approached him about the program, he immediately reached out to the computer science faculty. “We noted the U.S. Department of Labor Statistics predicted more than 25,000 job openings in cybersecurity in 2024,” he said. “That was before all of the high-profile cyber attacks on Target, EquiFax and the 2015 presidential election.” The core requirements of the cybersecurity program will give students important foundational software programming skills that complement their training in securing software, network and internet systems in a variety of business applications, Brittain said. “The elective courses in the cybersecurity program allow the students to focus their skills on critical industries vital to the importance of West Virginia and the nation such a health, retail and financial data, as well as digital forensics,” he said. “Students are required to complete a capstone to get their bachelor’s degree as evidence that they’re ready to successfully enter the workforce.” Brittain mentioned the capstone could be an internship, research project or successful completion of the CompTIA Security+ certification. “AB created the University Alliance Advisory Board composed of industry representatives to help us create and...

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How to protect an organisation: 5 cyber security tips

If businesses want to protect themselves from cyber threats, they must stay one step ahead of the ever-evolving and changing world of cybercrime At the beginning of each new year, there is no shortage of information security predictions and warnings. As we move further into 2018, Corey Nachreiner, CTO at WatchGuard Technologies takes stock and identifies five key issues to look out for. 1. IoT botnets will force governments to regulate In 2016, the Mirai botnet showed the world just how powerful an army of IoT devices can be, launching successful, record-breaking DDoS attacks against popular websites like Twitter, Reddit and Netflix. Attackers continue to target these devices due to their weak or non-existent security, both in development and deployment. “Attackers have already started improving on the Mirai source code, which will mean larger and stronger botnets in 2018. For example, the Reaper botnet actively exploits common vulnerabilities in IoT devices to gain access to the devices instead of relying on a hard-coded credential list,” said Corey Nachreiner. As attacks continue to grow in effectiveness, the damage they cause will grow until the IoT manufacturing industry is incentivised or forced to add stronger security to their products by government regulation to address IoT security.” Potential IoT device regulation will most likely affect manufacturers of consumer-grade IoT devices first and will likely mirror similar liability-oriented regulations in other industries, where...

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Cybersecurity job fatigue affects many security professionals

The cyber security skills shortage is increasing, and it’s having a negative effect on information security professionals and their organizations. According to ESG research, 51 percent of organizations report having a “problematic shortage” of cybersecurity skills in 2018. This is up from 45 percent in 2017. This skills shortage has multiple implications. Organizations don’t have the right sized teams and operate in a perpetually understaffed mode. Often, the cybersecurity team lacks some advanced skills in areas like security analytics, forensic investigations, or cloud computing security, putting more pressure on the most experienced staffers to pick up the slack. Finally, many organizations are so busy with day-to-day security operations that they have little time for ongoing cybersecurity training. According to research from ESG and the information systems security association (ISSA), 62 percent of cybersecurity professionals believe their organization is not providing an adequate level of training for them to keep up with business and IT risks. The cybersecurity skills shortage affects infosec professionals Clearly the cybersecurity skills shortage is affecting organizations, but what’s often overlooked is the impact it has on the cybersecurity pros in the trenches. For example, the ESG/ISSA research indicates: 70 percent of cybersecurity professionals say the cybersecurity skills shortage has had some impact on their organization. Of course, they are living this impact. 63 percent of cybersecurity professionals say the cybersecurity skills shortage has increased the...

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HEROIC.com Intends To Disrupt Cybersecurity With AI And The Blockchain

I’ve written before about the benefits athletes bring to entrepreneurship and business. This week I had the chance to address these questions with tech entrepreneur Chad Bennett, of Utah. At just 37, he has led two of his three prior companies (as I have) to multiple Inc. 500 wins. He’s an Ironman finisher. And he’s a father of five. Now he’s publicly launching his newest venture, HEROIC.com, to decentralize cybersecurity and make AI-powered protection available to the masses. Bennett’s background in cybersecurity began at age 14, when he taught himself to audit online systems for vulnerabilities. Later, he managed cybersecurity for one of the largest computing departments at Brigham Young University. In 2011, he founded Lancera, an enterprise software development and cybersecurity services company that ranked #149 and #146 on the Inc. 500 list of companies. One of Lancera’s clients was my own company, Fishbowl.  In 2015, frustrated with existing antivirus and modern cybersecurity solutions, he merged his experience in cybersecurity and artificial intelligence into HEROIC.com.  What led Bennett to centralize his efforts on blockchain? “I initially became interested in cryptocurrency in 2012 when I starting mining for bitcoins after reading Satoshi Nakamoto’s whitepaper [A peer-to-peer electronic cash system]” he says. “I recognized the disruptive effect blockchain and cryptocurrencies will have on the future of technology and business. It became the basis for our business.” Bennett spoke about a future where cyber threats...

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Nearly 75% of Organizations in 5 Countries Fail in Cyber Security Readiness: Hiscox

Major shortcomings exist in cyber security readiness for nearly three-quarters (73%) of more than 4,100 organizations in five countries, despite keen awareness of the threat, according to a study commissioned by specialist insurer Hiscox. Indeed, almost half, or 45 percent, of survey respondents experienced at least one cyber attack in the past year, while two-thirds suffered two or more attacks, said the “Hiscox Cyber Readiness Report 2018,” which surveyed a representative sample of private and public sector organizations in the UK, U.S., Germany, Spain and the Netherlands. (Hiscox published its first cyber readiness report in 2017). While the costs of cyber crime range up to $25 million, the average cost of all incidents for survey respondents was $229,000. However, the average cost “masks some wide variations,” said the report, explaining that the average costs ranged between $356,000 in Spain and $1.05 million in the U.S. for organizations with 1,000-plus employees. At the same time, some organizations faced still higher costs – up to $25 million in the U.S. and $20 million in Germany and the UK, the study confirmed. “For the very smallest (those with fewer than 100 employees), average costs ranged between $24,000 in Spain and $63,000 in Germany.” Financial services, energy, telecoms and government organizations are the prime targets for hackers, while financial services firms are the largest spenders on cyber security, followed by the pharmaceuticals and healthcare sector and...

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